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6080: Autumn Splendour
Fall's Bounty

Carve it up

A lovely autumn day is the best time for a drive in the countryside. It's also the perfect opportunity to get a taste for the local fruits, vegetables and produce that abound in your area. We met up with a pumpkin and an apple expert, each gives us some valuable information and tips on finding the best that this colourful season has to offer.

When it comes to pumpkins, there are many more available than the run-of-the-mill orange ones that we’re all used to seeing at Halloween time. A pit stop at the pumpkin patch reveals some interesting varieties. White pumpkins, such as “Casper” and “Lumina” are not typically used to make jack-o-lanterns, but are quite spellbinding nonetheless. The “Rouge Vive de Tanse”, or “Cinderella” pumpkins, perhaps so-called for their strong resemblance to the said fairy-tale carriage, are very heavy and dense. So what if there are warts on the surface? They give them character; you don’t always want a pristine pumpkin, do you?

Then, there’s the “Jarrahdale” squash, a favourite of Australia, which actually looks like a gray pumpkin and finally, the suitably named “Atlantic Giant”, the seeds of which are about as big as a thumb. A tip to remember: if you’re interested in using the pumpkins for cooking and not just decorations, the tastiest ones are the small sugar pumpkins, also known as pie pumpkins, as they are perfect for making pumpkin pie.

If you’re lucky enough to take a trip to an orchard and see apples on trees firsthand, you can expect to find quite the assortment of apples. Apple season is traditionally from about late July through October, but the idea is to get them off the trees before the wind gets there first.

Some of the many different varieties are “Matsus” and “Romes”. The “Ida Red” and the “Golden Delicious” are firm apples, great for pies and for eating. Whether it’s for baking, eating, or winter keeping, there are all types of apples for all types of people.